Paper Preference?

Hi All,

For those of you who print cards or other paper products, what is your house stock? Just curious. I’ve been using Neenah Lettra #110 for cards and works well and I don’t really have any complaints. But I have been hearing from some others that are using Boxcar’s Flurry, Mohawk Strathmore’s Impress Pure Cotton, Reich Savoy.

Wondering if there’s a big quality and price difference between the various brands that you’ve found?

Just wondering if there are any big upsides one way or another in your opinion.

Thanks!
Mike

image: Cards-Lettra-110-PearlWhite.JPG

Cards-Lettra-110-PearlWhite.JPG

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Savoy is great. I really can’t think of a better paper in my opinion, the main complaint I hear from people is that it is not very textured/rough.

Legion Bamboo is a nice alternative to the cotton stocks. I have found it to take ink and impression quite well. It’s got a double thick option that is good for non-folding invitation type work. Kind of a uniform roughness to it.

I also really like Coventry Rag in 335 GSM, in the ‘smooth’ version. It comes in rather large sheets but you can have Legion cut it to press-sheet size for you for a small fee. I suggest checking out samples of it. Nice rag stock, sized on the inside and outside so quite stable.

Somerset in Satin or Velvet- 300 GSM. I like it in both versions, it’s totally soft cotton stock. A bit pricey but quite. Comes in 30x44 sheets that you can convert to a more flexible press-sheet size than some of the other stocks in 26x40 (the extra coupe inches sometimes means a few more pieces out of a parent sheet.)

I love the Revere suede 300 gsm https://legionpaper.com/revere
not too thick, takes a nice impression and folds well
Steve
Whistle Pig Press

Cool. Thanks guys!

I’ll check out Revere and Savoy.
Appreciate all of the extra info!

Mike

I really like Wild from Neenahpaper.com -

I print mostly posters or other large formats - the heavy stock has a quality feel to it and it prints extremely well

LD

The Boxcar Flurry prints well. I’ve tested it, and used it for some small jobs with good success.

John Henry
Cedar Creek Press

Thanks, Letterpress Dad and John! I’ll look into those.

I did just order some Flurry to test. It is a smoother sheet than Lettra it seems. Almost close to French Paper’s Pop-Tone Whip Cream.

I recently discovered Wild from Neenah too. It looks like a really cool sheet. I am interested to try the 340# for something. Not sure what. But looks like it could be fun!

“The Boxcar Flurry prints well. I’ve tested it, and used it for some small jobs with good success.”

Have you used their “text” weight paper? I have one of their swatch books and have a few concerns as it seems a bit thin. If I print on one side, will it be visible on the other side? If I print with a relatively deep impression, will that interfere when the other side is printed?

I’m planning to print a book and before I order 1500 sheets of the stuff… you get where this is going?

Thanks.

The Flurry Cotton 80# text is an 8 point thick sheet. The bruising on the back depends on presswork and packing, but it should perform similarly to other 8 point thick cotton sheets. Although we didn’t design the paper with bookwork in mind, it should work well for the purpose. We’re always happy to send samples for testing if you’re unsure. Let us know at [email protected]

Regarding the smoothness: the 80# text weight paper is open (uncalendared) but we do nip the cover weight papers slightly to provide a more consistent thickness and a more even printing surface. Regardless, all weights of paper should have Sheffield smoothness around 360. (By comparison, all Lettra weights have a “spec” of 400 Sheffield.) I don’t know the Sheffield for Pop-tone but then again it’s not a cotton paper.

I’m happy to field any other questions about Flurry Cotton here or via email.

Thanks. I ordered a package so I have some to experiment with. As many here will attest, I have much to learn… like the difference between a bite and a kiss and the relative values of each methodology. After a weekend of reading about this and other subjects, I’m leaning toward lighter impressions.

In any case, if the Flurry text does not prove suitable, I’m sure I can find something else to use it for.