Mystery part

Does anyone know what this is? There are two part numbers AF-817 and AF-812 which I have searched for online, nothing coming up. Asked Boxcar press about it, they don’t know. It came with my press when I bought it around 6 years ago, but was just sitting on the pallet. I have no idea if it actually is supposed to go on the press or if it’s some misc. piece from something else. Either way, I’ve been printing for 6 years without out it. Thank you for any help!

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This is only a guess, but they might be parts from a Kluge press feeder. The attached parts list has a few parts with the prefix AF, but I didn’t see your parts (however I may have missed them). Also, there may have been other models of Kluge presses which your parts came from. Or, of course, they might not be from a Kluge at all.

https://d1mkprg9bp64fp.cloudfront.net/wp-content/blogs.dir/2/files/2012/...

Is your press a Kluge, or was there a Kluge press where you got your press from?

Never seen this parts on a Kluge

My press is a 10 x 15 chandler and price, late 1910s. But it did come from a shop with a proofing press but I don’t know what kind. There is another part on my press with an AF, it’s bolted onto the throw off assembly but it doesn’t look like it would attach to this anywhere.

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Don’t know what it is but …… I’ve seen it somewhere and perhaps it is from a c & p with a Miller Feeder and just maybe AF stands for Automatic Feed….what do you guys think? Guess what, I found my old Miller Automatic Feeder Parts Book . Yup, there it is on page 32 it shows AF 812 as “throw off latch” and AF 732 as “throw off bell set collar”. Parts were for a 10 x 15 Miller Automatic Feeder. Back them it was common to see a C & P with Miller feeders as well as Kluge and Rice feeders. Over the years most of the Millers and many of the Rice feeders have been removed to convert the press back to hand feed. Perhaps your press is one of those. Bud

Bud, Thank you so much for solving this mystery for me! I’m embarrassed it took me so long to respond to you. Did they just not work very well, is that why they have been removed? Thanks again!

We ll, I’m glad I was able to shed some light on those parts.. I had a 10x15 c&p with a rice feeder back in the early 60’s, It was too much press for me at the time. I remember I sold it to some printer in Oakland who had a commercial shop, he was very much excited to get it…he loved the press…I couldn’t wait to get rid of it at the time. Wish I had it back now. There were many c&p set up with these feeders in the early days, but somewhere around 1919 Kluge started making the press and feeder as a complete machine. That must have killed the add-on feeder market. In answer to your question, I’m sure they worked very well for its’ time. But as they saw “printing is the mother of progress” Bud

We ll, I’m glad I was able to shed some light on those parts.. I had a 10x15 c&p with a rice feeder back in the early 60’s, It was too much press for me at the time. I remember I sold it to some printer in Oakland who had a commercial shop, he was very much excited to get it…he loved the press…I couldn’t wait to get rid of it at the time. Wish I had it back now. There were many c&p set up with these feeders in the early days, but somewhere around 1919 Kluge started making the press and feeder as a complete machine. That must have killed the add-on feeder market. In answer to your question, I’m sure they worked very well for its’ time. But as they saw “printing is the mother of progress” Bud

We ll, I’m glad I was able to shed some light on those parts.. I had a 10x15 c&p with a rice feeder back in the early 60’s, It was too much press for me at the time. I remember I sold it to some printer in Oakland who had a commercial shop, he was very much excited to get it…he loved the press…I couldn’t wait to get rid of it at the time. Wish I had it back now. There were many c&p set up with these feeders in the early days, but somewhere around 1919 Kluge started making the press and feeder as a complete machine. That must have killed the add-on feeder market. In answer to your question, I’m sure they worked very well for its’ time. But as they saw “printing is the mother of progress” Bud

I guess that is what happens when you hit the post comment button two times. Bud

To follow up on the question “Did they just not work very well, is that why they have been removed?”.

They are finicky. You really have to know how to get them just right to work, and there aren’t a lot of people around to explain that.

They’re only really useful for runs over 1000. It takes me about 10 minutes to get a hand fed press inked and ready to print. It takes me, on a good day, about 30 minutes to get a feeder ready. On a really bad day, over an hour. So if you’re shop isn’t doing 10,000 sheets of letterhead a day, it’s not that practical. However, it is totally the sweetest thing in the world when you have a press running so well that you can just watch it go.